How is radioactive dating done

After one half-life has elapsed, one half of the atoms of the nuclide in question will have decayed into a "daughter" nuclide, or decay product.In many cases, the daughter nuclide is radioactive, resulting in a decay chain.Furthermore, this energy could penetrate cardboard and even walls to fluoresce barium platinocyanide.

The use of various radioisotopes allows the dating of biological and geological samples with a high degree of accuracy.This chain eventually ends with the formation of a stable, nonradioactive daughter nuclide.Each step in such a chain is characterized by a distinct half-life.Radiometric dating, often called radioactive dating, is a technique used to determine the age of materials such as rocks.It is based on a comparison between the observed abundance of a naturally occurring radioactive isotope and its decay products, using known decay rates.Some evidence is also presented to show that radiometric results that are in agreement with the accepted geological time scale are selectively published in preference to those results that are not in agreement.

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